Dead Dolphin ashore May 2016

Dead Dolphin ashore May 2016

Sunday, 5 October 2014

Thanet coastlife in Cuba.

Recently I spent two weeks holiday in Cuba and as usual I took the opportunity to completely map out the area of the coast where I am staying. The intention being to build up a small collection and just to log where items can be found and seen out of interest. The part of Cuba where I was staying was on the Atlantic coast in Holguin province at a hotel called Sol Rio de Luna y Mares situated  in Guardaclavaca.
The area of beach opposite the hotel is well publicized on youtube and all contributors have covered everything very well. So what are the main features and what can be found and seen ?
I suppose the most outstanding feature has to be the fossilized coral that is unmissable. To the left of the hotel beach there is a small headland of which I had attached as a photograph, plus it can also be seen clearly seen on youtube. This headland consists entirely of fossilized coral like the cliff behind it. Both the cliff and headland have many interesting formations of which I have photographed below for reference.



Above, the headland as seen to the left of the Hotel Mares.



The cliff face as seen facing the head land.


Fossilized coral formations as from ground level.


Above and below more coral formations at ground level.





Lumps of fossilized coral pushed up against the cliff by the tide.


A view from the headland looking back at the hotel.


Above and below close up view of the fossilized corals.


Below, further in from the waters edge many lumps of fossilized brain coral are be found. This was the largest piece I came across and used my shoe to give so idea of scale.

1 comment:

Alasdair Bruce said...

Fantastic stuff Tony, I've only been to the Caribbean once, a tiny island called Anguilla. The same scene can be found there on the coast with the addition of fossilized urchins, crabs and sharks teeth. As I"m sure you know, all this fossil coral is the relic of the sea level rises and falls of the last Ice Age. I wonder if fossil coral comes under CITES. I would have found it hard to resist the brain coral you photographed!