Dead Dolphin ashore May 2016

Dead Dolphin ashore May 2016

Saturday, 27 April 2013

Whatever has happened to the mud larking ?

 The weather during the whole of March and the early part of April has been a complete disaster for making any historical finds on Margate main sands below the tide line. The constant strong north easterly winds during the early part of spring have banked up thousands of tons of clean sand  covering over the areas that have eroded down to clay and mud over the past couple of years. This has buried everything and even though the bay looks nice the chances of finding any items from the 1700 and 1800 does look very remote for the foreseeable future as everything has been re buried . Undeterred , before I went to the dedication of the Victory lugger memorial today  I had a quick scout on the main sands.The tide was really on the move so I opted for the area behind the tidal  pool on the main sands that is being refurbished. I chose to look where the sluice gates are going to be built. At present there are three holes at the back of the pool and twice a day the pool drains through these three holes. Due to the deep digging at the back of the pool the tops layers of silt and debris from the spoil heaps are being sucked through the holes leaving anything of any density deposited out side the pool. It is mostly shingle that is deposited but among the shingle interesting historical items can be found. Today I can across pieces of broken glass that can be easily identifiable as from the second half of the 19th century and in most cases it is bottle bases due to weight and density. Even though finds where few and far between I came across a base from a dipped moulded  spirit bottle that had been blown in a dip mould and then the kick up in the base neatly finished off, date probably 1850's or even early 1860's.
The rest of the glass was Victorian green aqua mineral water glass of some thickness  and typical 1890's. Two of the bases where embossed and both came from London and from J M Taylor Camberwell. Which I must say is the most common London mineral water company find at Margate from the Victorian era. The broken glass base pictured below is part of a Hamilton design conical soda water bottle. The only part of the lettering  visible is the M . Taylor part of the name. Due to the uniform thickness of the glass I would say the bottle was a soda water bottle probably late 1890's.

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