Dead Dolphin ashore May 2016

Dead Dolphin ashore May 2016

Thursday, 15 November 2012

Margate main sands and a November ramble.

This morning up I was up early to catch the low water at Margate at daybreak. The low water was a .5 which is nothing special but it is the first tide since the strong winds we had a fortnight ago that certain areas are accessible.
On arrival I noticed the low water area that had washed out a fortnight ago resembled the lunar landscape with holes everywhere. This is due to the daily pounding the area receives from metal detector users in their quest for gold as there were also discarded metal items to be seen. The popularity of beachcombing at Margate  was also evident as there was a complete absence of  the surface finds often associated  with the area like the weather beaten  shards of patterned crockery for example. I not sure if it is me blogging the fact that Margate main sands are a historical goldmine, but these days I am never short of company something I do welcome. However, I am sure that will change when the thermometer hits the minus and the northerly winds hit the beaches head on.
Today I set out with a different approach as I have been thinking for some time that I am becoming to reliant on surface finds and it is about time I did some proper digging. Digging holes in wet sand mixed with shingle and clay  is hard work and I am sure not many people will be following in my footsteps on that one.
Like everything else on the beach, where to dig does  take a bit of working out because there is no such thing as a historical layers like inland, so today was dedicated to digging pilot holes. It is surprising that some areas of the beach at low water are not far off from the clay bed from the old creek which makes the prospect of digging for finds in the future more promising.
Today I came across the most common find that can be found on any Victorian site in the country and Margate is no exception. The piece in question being a fragment of a James Keiller & sons Dundee Marmalade pot and everyone who has ever dug a Victorian site has most definitely came across a piece.
I am not sure of the date of this fragment even though it states that James Keiller won a medal of merit for his marmalade in Vienna in 1873. All I can think of is that it must be post 1878 as that was the year when transfer printing on earthenware pots were perfected.

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